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April 15, 2019

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Joe

More evidence of the problem:

The groundwater beneath the Central Valley has been steadily depleting, particularly as the state’s $50 billion agricultural industry relied on it during a series of droughts. Each year, more water exits the aquifer than goes into it.

The study from Stanford’s School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences, published in the journal Water Resources Research, found that unless action is taken, the ground in that region will sink more than 13 feet over the next 20 years.

Former Gov. Jerry Brown in 2014 signed a law to increase regulation of over-drafted groundwater basins. It takes effect gradually. By 2020, newly formed groundwater management agencies must develop plans to make their aquifers sustainable.

After he signed the law, farmers dug hundreds of new wells. In 2016 alone, Central Valley farmers created 2,500 new wells, according to a Sacramento Bee analysis of state records.

https://www.sacbee.com/news/state/california/big-valley/article229148999.html

hollyroller@gmail.com

Excellent Report Joe.
Water is the most basic and necessary element needed for life. From Drinking, to Sanitation. It is difficult to comprehend an event like this-earthquake, happening when the world goes around so quickly.
Scary.

hollyroller@gmail.com

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Joe

Check out my update showing the 33 gallon emergency water barrel I just got from our local company, Earthshakes.com.

Joe

The Fourth of July quake of 2019 is another reminder to be prepared:

The largest earthquake in two decades rattled Southern California on Thursday morning, shaking communities from Las Vegas to Long Beach and ending a quiet period in the state’s seismic history.

Striking at 10:33 a.m., the magnitude 6.4 temblor was centered about 125 miles northeast of Los Angeles in the remote Searles Valley area of Kern County.

Before Thursday, it had been almost five years since the state experienced an earthquake of magnitude 6 or stronger. Experts had said the period of calm was sure to end, and when it did it would likely bring destruction.

Joe

Just in case you needed another warning/reminder:

Friday’s (i.e. Today's) 7.1 and Thursday’s (i.e Yesterday's) 6.4 both had epicenters near the community of Ridgecrest. The Thursday quake was already the biggest to hit Southern California in 20 years. The quake Friday evening obliterated that mark. The 6.4 quake is now considered a foreshock to Thursday’s event.

Friday evening, California Governor Gavin Newsom issued a statement offering his and the state’s “heartfelt support” to those in the region affected by the quake.

(Oh, great. While the Gavinor is busy spouting off about "free" health care for illegal immigrants and "free" college tuition, he has "heartfelt support" over earthquakes. Remember a 7.0 is 10x a 6.0 and we are on our own for 48 hours to a full month as noted above).

Peter Garrison

Of course my kid is camping up the valley from Ridgecrest and the earthquake swarms are following him up the valley; or, more likely, he’s somehow responsible...

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